Date of Award

January 2013

Degree Type

Open Access Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

First Advisor

Charles S. Hausman

Department Affiliation

Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the leadership behaviors of rural police chief's in Kentucky through their self-perceptions and the perceptions of their subordinate officers utilizing the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) Form 5X Short. The author assessed differences in the leadership factors of the Full Range Leadership Model and leadership outcomes between rural police chiefs and their subordinate officers. The sample included 47 rural police chiefs from 4 different regions of Kentucky and 94 of their subordinate officers.

The results indicate that 8 out of the 9 leadership factors differed between the self-reported ratings by the rural police chiefs and the ratings of their subordinate officers. The only leadership factor on which chiefs and their subordinates agreed was management by exception-active. Rural police chiefs in Kentucky report using transformational and contingent reward more frequently than management by exception-active, management by exception-passive and laissez-faire leadership both at more significant level than were reported by their subordinate officers. Kentucky rural police chiefs perceive themselves as using engaging and motivating leadership behaviors more often than their subordinate officers perceive them using them. Further, rural chiefs perceive themselves as using corrective, passive and avoidant leadership styles less frequently than reported by their subordinate officers.

Rural police chiefs and their subordinates differed significantly on all three leadership outcomes. Rural police chiefs perceive themselves more strongly than do subordinate officers as influencing followers to give extra effort. Chiefs feel they are perceived as effective leaders by their followers and chiefs feel that their followers are satisfied with them as leaders at higher rates than do subordinate officers as groups.

The rural police chiefs self-report data that suggest a relationship between the 5 factors of transformational leadership, transactional contingent reward and the 3 leadership outcomes of extra effort, effectiveness, and satisfaction. Chief's perceptions, however, revealed no relationship between idealized influence-attributed and the 3 leadership outcomes. Research consistently shows a strong relationship between all factors of transformational leadership and the 3 leadership outcomes. However, no relationship in this study was found between management by exception-active, management by exception-passive, laissez-faire leadership and the 3 leadership outcomes although previous research consistently shows a strong negative relationship.

The subordinate officers report data that show a strong relationship between the 5 factors of transformational leadership and the 3 leadership outcomes. Additionally, they report data that show a strong negative relationship between management by exception-passive and Laissez-faire leadership and the 3 leadership outcomes.

Based on these findings, rural police leaders at all levels should be trained in the use of transformational leadership and transactional contingent reward. These leadership factors appear to motivate extra effort, and stimulate followers to view their leaders as effective, and sources of higher job satisfaction.

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