Project Title

Examination of how the body composition of a female, collegiate softball player changes over the course of a season and relationships to position on the field.

Major

Exercise and Sport Science

Department

Exercise and Sport Science

Degree

Graduate

Mentor

Michael T. Lane

Mentor Department

Exercise and Sport Science

Abstract

Introduction: Body composition is an important metric for general health and athletic performance. Currently there is a lack of research linking body composition to performance in collegiate Softball.

Purpose: To examine how the body composition of collegiate softball players changes over the course of a season.

Methods: The body composition of 18 female collegiate softball players was collected using a BodPod (COSMED USA, INC, Concord, CA). The subjects were tested on three occasions; September, November, and January. The subjects body fat % (BF%), lean body mass (LBM) and total body weight (BW) where collected and tracked during the course of the study.

Results: Height was 66.9±2.34 (height for position 66.1±2.37” and 67.8±2.11” for battery). Difference of mean BF% from the first to third test was 0.84%+2.39 (team), 0.63%+1.12 (field) and 1.06%+2.32 (battery). Difference of mean BW, from the first to third test was 3.83+6.26lbs. (team), 1.81+2.76lbs. (field) and 5.85+6.39lbs. (battery). The difference of mean LBM from the first to third test was 1.54+3.5lbs. (team), 0.39+4.08lbs. (field) and 2.7+2.54lbs. (battery). RMANOVA found a significance difference in BF% over the three time points (p=.018). Time was also shown to have a significance effect on BW by class, however not by position.

Discussion: This data shows that the body composition of female, collegiate softball players does change over the course of a season. There was no significant relationship to change based on the players’ position, but a significant relationship based on the players’ class was observed.

Presentation format

Poster

Poster Number

15

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Examination of how the body composition of a female, collegiate softball player changes over the course of a season and relationships to position on the field.

Introduction: Body composition is an important metric for general health and athletic performance. Currently there is a lack of research linking body composition to performance in collegiate Softball.

Purpose: To examine how the body composition of collegiate softball players changes over the course of a season.

Methods: The body composition of 18 female collegiate softball players was collected using a BodPod (COSMED USA, INC, Concord, CA). The subjects were tested on three occasions; September, November, and January. The subjects body fat % (BF%), lean body mass (LBM) and total body weight (BW) where collected and tracked during the course of the study.

Results: Height was 66.9±2.34 (height for position 66.1±2.37” and 67.8±2.11” for battery). Difference of mean BF% from the first to third test was 0.84%+2.39 (team), 0.63%+1.12 (field) and 1.06%+2.32 (battery). Difference of mean BW, from the first to third test was 3.83+6.26lbs. (team), 1.81+2.76lbs. (field) and 5.85+6.39lbs. (battery). The difference of mean LBM from the first to third test was 1.54+3.5lbs. (team), 0.39+4.08lbs. (field) and 2.7+2.54lbs. (battery). RMANOVA found a significance difference in BF% over the three time points (p=.018). Time was also shown to have a significance effect on BW by class, however not by position.

Discussion: This data shows that the body composition of female, collegiate softball players does change over the course of a season. There was no significant relationship to change based on the players’ position, but a significant relationship based on the players’ class was observed.