Project Title

Seven Years Later: A Comparative Study of Campsite Inventory in the Clifty Wilderness Area, Daniel Boone National Forest

Major

Recreation and Park Administration

Department

Recreation and Park Administration

Degree

Graduate

Mentor

Ryan L. Sharp & Michael J. Bradley

Mentor Department

Recreation and Park Administration

Abstract

Purpose of the Project

This 2014 Limits of Acceptable Change comparative study was performed in the Clifty Wilderness Area of theDanielBooneNational Forestto identify campsite locations and measure campsite conditions within the management area since 2007.

Methods

Researchers collected data using the 2007 LAC project protocol and a Trimble Global Positioning System receiver to collect location and measurements of campsites and impact area. GIS software, ArcMap 10, was used to analyze findings and compare data from both studies.

Results

Researchers discovered 318 campsites, a significant increase compared to the 222 discovered campsites in 2007. Comparing 2007and 2014 data, campsites were 31% larger and the percentage of Highly Impacted campsites increased, from 25% in 2007, to 29% in 2014. Geospatial Analysis revealed notable changes in number of campsites and condition class in various sections of the Clifty Wilderness Area, as well as user trends within the study area.

Discussion

Results show increased impact of camping within the Clifty Wilderness Area. This research highlights highly impacted areas which managers may need to intervene to mitigate negative impacts of recreation users. Additionally, analysis revealed areas where previous management interventions were successful and unsuccessful.

Presentation format

Poster

Poster Number

27

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Seven Years Later: A Comparative Study of Campsite Inventory in the Clifty Wilderness Area, Daniel Boone National Forest

Purpose of the Project

This 2014 Limits of Acceptable Change comparative study was performed in the Clifty Wilderness Area of theDanielBooneNational Forestto identify campsite locations and measure campsite conditions within the management area since 2007.

Methods

Researchers collected data using the 2007 LAC project protocol and a Trimble Global Positioning System receiver to collect location and measurements of campsites and impact area. GIS software, ArcMap 10, was used to analyze findings and compare data from both studies.

Results

Researchers discovered 318 campsites, a significant increase compared to the 222 discovered campsites in 2007. Comparing 2007and 2014 data, campsites were 31% larger and the percentage of Highly Impacted campsites increased, from 25% in 2007, to 29% in 2014. Geospatial Analysis revealed notable changes in number of campsites and condition class in various sections of the Clifty Wilderness Area, as well as user trends within the study area.

Discussion

Results show increased impact of camping within the Clifty Wilderness Area. This research highlights highly impacted areas which managers may need to intervene to mitigate negative impacts of recreation users. Additionally, analysis revealed areas where previous management interventions were successful and unsuccessful.