Project Title

Overcoming the Spatial Constraints of Flipping the Classroom at Eastern Kentucky University

Major

English

Department

English and Theatre

Degree

Graduate

Mentor

Jill Parrott

Mentor Department

English and Theatre

Abstract

The “flipped” instruction method emphasizes active learning in the classroom through engagement of students in the higher levels of Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy. With this revolution in teaching/learning methodology, classroom spaces designed with the transmission model of communication in mind must be re-evaluated to determine the suitability of their arrangement with new, innovative techniques.

I observed classes in six different classrooms at Eastern Kentucky University. Three were traditional classrooms, while three were renovated spaces incorporating mobility, flexibility, and accessible technology. In addition to observing the classes, I made detailed diagrams notating the arrangement (and possibility for re-arrangement) of each facility. These diagrams will be utilized as visuals on my research poster.

Those classrooms with fixed furnishings precluded student communication among groups. Instructors in the traditional classrooms expressed interest in flipping their class, but cited spatial restrictions as inhibiting this goal. Those in the more flexible spaces indicated that the design of their classrooms contributed to the ease of utilizing flipped techniques and reported that, having taught in the flexible space, they had developed methods that might translate to future teaching in traditional classrooms.

By developing a rotating schedule that exposes multiple instructors to the experience of teaching in a flexible environment, EKU could foster the development of flipped instruction methods in a variety of courses. In the pursuit of evolving educational techniques, providing instructors and students with viable learning environments represents a significant step toward enhancing the learning experience.

Presentation format

Poster

Poster Number

12

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Overcoming the Spatial Constraints of Flipping the Classroom at Eastern Kentucky University

The “flipped” instruction method emphasizes active learning in the classroom through engagement of students in the higher levels of Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy. With this revolution in teaching/learning methodology, classroom spaces designed with the transmission model of communication in mind must be re-evaluated to determine the suitability of their arrangement with new, innovative techniques.

I observed classes in six different classrooms at Eastern Kentucky University. Three were traditional classrooms, while three were renovated spaces incorporating mobility, flexibility, and accessible technology. In addition to observing the classes, I made detailed diagrams notating the arrangement (and possibility for re-arrangement) of each facility. These diagrams will be utilized as visuals on my research poster.

Those classrooms with fixed furnishings precluded student communication among groups. Instructors in the traditional classrooms expressed interest in flipping their class, but cited spatial restrictions as inhibiting this goal. Those in the more flexible spaces indicated that the design of their classrooms contributed to the ease of utilizing flipped techniques and reported that, having taught in the flexible space, they had developed methods that might translate to future teaching in traditional classrooms.

By developing a rotating schedule that exposes multiple instructors to the experience of teaching in a flexible environment, EKU could foster the development of flipped instruction methods in a variety of courses. In the pursuit of evolving educational techniques, providing instructors and students with viable learning environments represents a significant step toward enhancing the learning experience.