Project Title

Occupational Disengagement and Reengagement for Individuals with Chronic Pelvic Pain

Department

Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

Abstract

Approximately one in seven women in the United States suffer from chronic pelvic pain. Several health conditions can cause chronic pelvic pain including endometriosis, vulvodynia, and interstitial cystitis. Current medical treatment is best supervised by a urogynocologist and involves treating ongoing pain and flare-ups. Various medications, sacral neuromodulation, and bladder solutions are used to help control pain. Physical and occupational therapy can bring about a reduction in symptoms of chronic pelvic pain.

Bladder urgency, frequency, and pain can interfere with everyday normal activities. It can have a major impact on sleep, physical, psychosocial, work, and sexual activities of a client. Ingestion of certain foods and emotional stress can exacerbate chronic pelvic pain making it difficult to continue employment. Personal relationships and sexual activity are greatly affected by interstitial cystitis and vulvodynia.

Occupational therapy interventions for individuals with chronic pelvic pain can support reengagement in all areas of occupation. Adaptations can be provided for restorative sleep. Bowel and bladder retraining can optimize functioning. Myofascial release techniques applied to the pelvic area can relieve tight muscles. Stress reduction techniques such as yoga, deep breathing exercises, guided imagery, and warm baths can also decrease hypertonus in the pelvic floor muscles.

Educating chronic pelvic pain clients in dietary changes and medication routines are helpful for health management. Occupational therapists can offer adaptations that decrease pain triggers and support reengagement in occupations. With improved sleep, decreased pelvic pain, and overall better health management, individuals can reengage in their family, leisure, and social activities again.

Presentation format

Poster

Poster Number

143

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Occupational Disengagement and Reengagement for Individuals with Chronic Pelvic Pain

Approximately one in seven women in the United States suffer from chronic pelvic pain. Several health conditions can cause chronic pelvic pain including endometriosis, vulvodynia, and interstitial cystitis. Current medical treatment is best supervised by a urogynocologist and involves treating ongoing pain and flare-ups. Various medications, sacral neuromodulation, and bladder solutions are used to help control pain. Physical and occupational therapy can bring about a reduction in symptoms of chronic pelvic pain.

Bladder urgency, frequency, and pain can interfere with everyday normal activities. It can have a major impact on sleep, physical, psychosocial, work, and sexual activities of a client. Ingestion of certain foods and emotional stress can exacerbate chronic pelvic pain making it difficult to continue employment. Personal relationships and sexual activity are greatly affected by interstitial cystitis and vulvodynia.

Occupational therapy interventions for individuals with chronic pelvic pain can support reengagement in all areas of occupation. Adaptations can be provided for restorative sleep. Bowel and bladder retraining can optimize functioning. Myofascial release techniques applied to the pelvic area can relieve tight muscles. Stress reduction techniques such as yoga, deep breathing exercises, guided imagery, and warm baths can also decrease hypertonus in the pelvic floor muscles.

Educating chronic pelvic pain clients in dietary changes and medication routines are helpful for health management. Occupational therapists can offer adaptations that decrease pain triggers and support reengagement in occupations. With improved sleep, decreased pelvic pain, and overall better health management, individuals can reengage in their family, leisure, and social activities again.