Project Title

Can Therapeutic Horsemanship Benefit Children on the Autism Spectrum?

Presenter Hometown

Bow, NH

Major

Recreation and Park Administration

Department

Recreation and Park Administration

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Michelle Davis Gerken

Mentor Department

Recreation and Park Administration

Abstract

Children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are becoming more prevalent in todays world. With the increase of individuals having autism spectrum disorder there is a need for new innovative forms of therapy. Therapeutic horsemanship is an intervention that has many benefits for children with autism spectrum disorder. The objective of this study is to examine qualitative research on the benefits of therapeutic horsemanship and children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and determine whether therapeutic horsemanship is an effective intervention. Research shows that children that participate in therapeutic horsemanship become less irritable, less hyperactive, and show overall improvement (Bass, Duchowny, & Llabre, 2009). Therapeutic horsemanship is an effective intervention because research has shown benefits in the emotional, developmental, and quality of life in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. These finding will offer a non-traditional intervention that allows children with autisms spectrum disorder to improve their quality of life.

Presentation format

Poster

Poster Number

102

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Can Therapeutic Horsemanship Benefit Children on the Autism Spectrum?

Children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are becoming more prevalent in todays world. With the increase of individuals having autism spectrum disorder there is a need for new innovative forms of therapy. Therapeutic horsemanship is an intervention that has many benefits for children with autism spectrum disorder. The objective of this study is to examine qualitative research on the benefits of therapeutic horsemanship and children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and determine whether therapeutic horsemanship is an effective intervention. Research shows that children that participate in therapeutic horsemanship become less irritable, less hyperactive, and show overall improvement (Bass, Duchowny, & Llabre, 2009). Therapeutic horsemanship is an effective intervention because research has shown benefits in the emotional, developmental, and quality of life in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. These finding will offer a non-traditional intervention that allows children with autisms spectrum disorder to improve their quality of life.