Date of Award

January 2018

Degree Type

Open Access Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Jonathan S. Gore

Second Advisor

Robert Mitchell

Third Advisor

James N. Maples

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to connect possible factors that may influence homonegativity within an individual. Specifically, we hypothesized that a) high amounts of societal threats and high levels of tightness will predict orthodox orientation, which will be associated with higher levels of homonegativity, b) high amounts of societal threats and high levels of tightness will predict intrinsic orientation, which will be rated with higher levels of homonegativity, c) high amounts of societal threats and high levels of tightness with extrinsic orientation will predict high on levels of homonegativity, d) low amounts of societal threats and looseness with extrinsic orientation will predict lower levels of homonegativity, e) low amounts of societal threats and low levels of tightness will predict quest orientation, which will have lower levels of homonegativity, f) and low amounts of societal threats and low levels of tightness will predict secularism, which will have lower levels of homonegativity. Participants (n=472) completed an online survey of societal threats, tightness, religious orientation, and homonegativity. The results shown that societal/perceived threat in hometown areas may predict one's religious orientation, as well as religious orientation, may predict an individual's level of homonegativity.

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