Project Title

The Effects of Time Perspective and Gender on the Effectiveness of Meditation

Presenter Hometown

Lexington, KY

Major

Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Jonathan S. Gore

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

Recent research suggests that meditation is a healthy way to cope with stress and anxiety, but it is also important to focus on how individual differences affect the productivity of those meditation practices. This study aims to find a link between time perception, gender and the effectiveness of meditation. This study tests the hypothesis that past time perspective will have a stronger positive correlation to reductions in post-meditation anxiety for males more than females, that future time perspective will have a stronger positive correlation to reductions in post-meditation anxiety for females more than males, and that present time perspective will have no significant correlation to reductions in post-meditation anxiety. A sample of undergraduate students (n = 90), participated in three online surveys and participated in a 10-minute meditation session afterwards. As expected, there was a stronger positive correlation to past-time perception and reductions in post-meditation anxiety for males more than females, and present time perception had no significant correlation to reductions in post-meditation anxiety. However, the hypothesis that future time perspective will have a stronger positive correlation to reductions in post-meditation anxiety for females more than males was not supported.

Presentation format

Poster

Share

COinS
 

The Effects of Time Perspective and Gender on the Effectiveness of Meditation

Recent research suggests that meditation is a healthy way to cope with stress and anxiety, but it is also important to focus on how individual differences affect the productivity of those meditation practices. This study aims to find a link between time perception, gender and the effectiveness of meditation. This study tests the hypothesis that past time perspective will have a stronger positive correlation to reductions in post-meditation anxiety for males more than females, that future time perspective will have a stronger positive correlation to reductions in post-meditation anxiety for females more than males, and that present time perspective will have no significant correlation to reductions in post-meditation anxiety. A sample of undergraduate students (n = 90), participated in three online surveys and participated in a 10-minute meditation session afterwards. As expected, there was a stronger positive correlation to past-time perception and reductions in post-meditation anxiety for males more than females, and present time perception had no significant correlation to reductions in post-meditation anxiety. However, the hypothesis that future time perspective will have a stronger positive correlation to reductions in post-meditation anxiety for females more than males was not supported.