Project Title

Medical Tourism: Health Effects of a Growing Global Economy

Presenter Hometown

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Major

Environmental Health Science

Department

Environmental Health Science

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Vonia Grabeel, RS, MPH

Mentor Department

Environmental Health Science

Abstract

Medical Tourism: Health Effects of a Growing Global Economy

The industry of medical tourism is not a modern-day approach to healthcare, having been a frequent practice among the European elite starting in the 15th century. With the growth of urbanization, methods for transporting patients to and from medical facilities, especially abroad, has become ever more efficient and cost-effective. Thus, treatment plans that once only seemed plausible for an individual of a higher class have become a popular commodity among multiple socioeconomic classes and has inspired with its expansion a dispute in public health between cost and quality.

What influenced the demographic change of healthcare tourism from the United States to developing nations? What is the difference in healthcare standards between these countries? What influences different socioeconomic classes to seek healthcare somewhere outside their home country? What are the current procedures and regulations in place to enable a safe and secure procedure?

What risks are associated with high-risk procedures and travel? What are the medical and economic complications present in medical tourism? Do the benefits of cheaper medical procedures outweigh the possible risks and complications present? What is the future of medical tourism?

Presentation format

Poster

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Medical Tourism: Health Effects of a Growing Global Economy

Medical Tourism: Health Effects of a Growing Global Economy

The industry of medical tourism is not a modern-day approach to healthcare, having been a frequent practice among the European elite starting in the 15th century. With the growth of urbanization, methods for transporting patients to and from medical facilities, especially abroad, has become ever more efficient and cost-effective. Thus, treatment plans that once only seemed plausible for an individual of a higher class have become a popular commodity among multiple socioeconomic classes and has inspired with its expansion a dispute in public health between cost and quality.

What influenced the demographic change of healthcare tourism from the United States to developing nations? What is the difference in healthcare standards between these countries? What influences different socioeconomic classes to seek healthcare somewhere outside their home country? What are the current procedures and regulations in place to enable a safe and secure procedure?

What risks are associated with high-risk procedures and travel? What are the medical and economic complications present in medical tourism? Do the benefits of cheaper medical procedures outweigh the possible risks and complications present? What is the future of medical tourism?