Project Title

Changes in Shaker Theology through Westward Expansion: An Analysis of Death Traditions

Presenter Information

Sarah ParrettFollow

Presenter Hometown

Richmond

Major

Anthropology

Department

Anthropology, Sociology, and Social Work

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Dr. Kelli Carmean

Mentor Department

Anthropology, Sociology, and Social Work

Abstract

Through their expansion west into the American frontier, the religious group known as the Shakers experienced theological and cultural changes between their original New England communities and the newer established communities in the west. Three specific death traditions are examined as means to measure the changes in expressions of religiosity among two sites: Mount Lebanon, New York and Pleasant Hill, Kentucky. Higher amounts of change among religiosity represents the Shakers’ culture becoming more “worldly” opposed to remaining traditional in their cultural theologies and practices.

Presentation format

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Changes in Shaker Theology through Westward Expansion: An Analysis of Death Traditions

Through their expansion west into the American frontier, the religious group known as the Shakers experienced theological and cultural changes between their original New England communities and the newer established communities in the west. Three specific death traditions are examined as means to measure the changes in expressions of religiosity among two sites: Mount Lebanon, New York and Pleasant Hill, Kentucky. Higher amounts of change among religiosity represents the Shakers’ culture becoming more “worldly” opposed to remaining traditional in their cultural theologies and practices.