Project Title

Testing the Rejection-Identification Model in Appalachia

Presenter Hometown

Louisville

Major

I/O Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Jonathan Gore

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

In the present study, the proposed model tests the hypotheses that the rejection from a dominant group will result in a direct adverse effect on well-being, as well as positive effects that are mediated by ingroup identification and self-stereotyping. The purpose of this study is to validate the Rejection-Identification Model among Appalachians, and how perceived discrimination predicts their personal and collective self-esteem. This study hypothesizes that discrimination will have a negative association with the individual’s well-being. Our study also hypothesizes that increased discrimination levels will lead to a direct positive association with ingroup identification levels, where the victims of discrimination will identify more with their ingroup characteristics. Ingroup identification will have a positive relationship with self-stereotyping levels as well as with one’s well-being. These associations are also proposed to be stronger for men than women, and that individuals residing in more urban areas will have stronger associations than those who reside in a more rural area. Participants were (n = 384) undergraduate students from Eastern Kentucky University, had completed several questionnaires in an online survey that assessed the various aspects of RIM on individual and collective wellbeing. The results supported the majority of the model that perceived discrimination influences individuals engaging in ingroup identification and self-stereotyping behaviors, but self-stereotyping did not predict personal nor collective esteem. The results demonstrate that regional cultures experience a similar coping process for discrimination as other stigmatized groups and should be taken in consideration with professionals and practitioners in the particular culture.

Presentation format

Poster

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Testing the Rejection-Identification Model in Appalachia

In the present study, the proposed model tests the hypotheses that the rejection from a dominant group will result in a direct adverse effect on well-being, as well as positive effects that are mediated by ingroup identification and self-stereotyping. The purpose of this study is to validate the Rejection-Identification Model among Appalachians, and how perceived discrimination predicts their personal and collective self-esteem. This study hypothesizes that discrimination will have a negative association with the individual’s well-being. Our study also hypothesizes that increased discrimination levels will lead to a direct positive association with ingroup identification levels, where the victims of discrimination will identify more with their ingroup characteristics. Ingroup identification will have a positive relationship with self-stereotyping levels as well as with one’s well-being. These associations are also proposed to be stronger for men than women, and that individuals residing in more urban areas will have stronger associations than those who reside in a more rural area. Participants were (n = 384) undergraduate students from Eastern Kentucky University, had completed several questionnaires in an online survey that assessed the various aspects of RIM on individual and collective wellbeing. The results supported the majority of the model that perceived discrimination influences individuals engaging in ingroup identification and self-stereotyping behaviors, but self-stereotyping did not predict personal nor collective esteem. The results demonstrate that regional cultures experience a similar coping process for discrimination as other stigmatized groups and should be taken in consideration with professionals and practitioners in the particular culture.