Project Title

"Acquisition, Accessibility, and Cataloguing: Considering the Implications of ‘A Room of One’s Own’ in English Education"

Presenter Hometown

Irvine, KY

Major

English Teaching

Department

English and Theatre

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Dr. Heather Fox

Mentor Department

English and Theatre

Abstract

Virginia Woolf argues in A Room of One’s Own (1928, 1929) that women writers need a designated space; however, her premise applies to any group engaged in critical and creative inquiry. John Staunton argues in Deranging English / Education (2008) that English Education constitutes a hybridity, in which students and educators negotiate disciplinary intersections. As an independent study, developed with Dr. Heather Fox (English department) and Jackie Couture and Debbie Whalen (Special Collections & Archives), I identified the EKU Writing Project’s resources room as a space designed to collaboratively examine these intersections. First, I researched the implications of acquisition, accessibility, and cataloging. Then, I applied these insights to my processing of an item in the archives to inform my teaching of artifacts in the K12 classroom. The second part of the project builds on this experience to organize multiple copies of English pedagogy materials. This project constitutes one response to “a room of one’s own” for students and faculty invested in meaningful learning opportunities that promote relationships between English studies and pre-service teachers.

Presentation format

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

"Acquisition, Accessibility, and Cataloguing: Considering the Implications of ‘A Room of One’s Own’ in English Education"

Virginia Woolf argues in A Room of One’s Own (1928, 1929) that women writers need a designated space; however, her premise applies to any group engaged in critical and creative inquiry. John Staunton argues in Deranging English / Education (2008) that English Education constitutes a hybridity, in which students and educators negotiate disciplinary intersections. As an independent study, developed with Dr. Heather Fox (English department) and Jackie Couture and Debbie Whalen (Special Collections & Archives), I identified the EKU Writing Project’s resources room as a space designed to collaboratively examine these intersections. First, I researched the implications of acquisition, accessibility, and cataloging. Then, I applied these insights to my processing of an item in the archives to inform my teaching of artifacts in the K12 classroom. The second part of the project builds on this experience to organize multiple copies of English pedagogy materials. This project constitutes one response to “a room of one’s own” for students and faculty invested in meaningful learning opportunities that promote relationships between English studies and pre-service teachers.