Project Title

An Analysis of Individualism and Collectivism in Kentucky High School Football

Presenter Hometown

Richmond

Major

Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Jonathan S. Gore

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

Two different groups of individuals from two separate counties in Kentucky were observed at high school football games in order to evaluate specific cultural concepts representative of collectivistic and individualistic societies. The two groups observed were individuals in Estill County and individuals in Fayette County Kentucky. The specific cultural categories examined included individualism/collectivism, looseness/tightness, gender roles, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, independent/interdependent self-construal, autonomous/relatedness in child rearing, individualized/group cognition and learning, emotional expressiveness, personal/relational motivation, conformity, obedience, horizontal/vertical relationships, aggression, prejudice, and time orientation. The two environments provided information to further evaluate differences and similarities in content-specific behaviors in the tightness/looseness, emotional expressiveness, gender roles, and conformity categories. The two locations differed in tightness/looseness and emotional expressiveness and were found to be similar in gender roles and conformity. These similarities and differences could be a result of demographic and cultural differences between the groups in part due to one region being more collectivistic and the other more individualistic.

Presentation format

Poster

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An Analysis of Individualism and Collectivism in Kentucky High School Football

Two different groups of individuals from two separate counties in Kentucky were observed at high school football games in order to evaluate specific cultural concepts representative of collectivistic and individualistic societies. The two groups observed were individuals in Estill County and individuals in Fayette County Kentucky. The specific cultural categories examined included individualism/collectivism, looseness/tightness, gender roles, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, independent/interdependent self-construal, autonomous/relatedness in child rearing, individualized/group cognition and learning, emotional expressiveness, personal/relational motivation, conformity, obedience, horizontal/vertical relationships, aggression, prejudice, and time orientation. The two environments provided information to further evaluate differences and similarities in content-specific behaviors in the tightness/looseness, emotional expressiveness, gender roles, and conformity categories. The two locations differed in tightness/looseness and emotional expressiveness and were found to be similar in gender roles and conformity. These similarities and differences could be a result of demographic and cultural differences between the groups in part due to one region being more collectivistic and the other more individualistic.