University Presentation Showcase: Undergraduate Division

Project Title

The Role of Locus of Control in Predicting Distress in Different Economic Sectors

Presenter Information

Nailah JohnsonFollow

Presenter Hometown

Louisville, KY

Major

Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Jonathan Gore

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

The present study examines locus of control with job sectors and determining psychological distress. We hypothesized that job sector prevalence in society links the LOC of its residents which in turn predicts psychological distress. We did a multiple regression to examine the variables of government assistance, psychological distress, LOC and economic sectors. The study measured LOC and distress through Mechanical Turk (n = 158). The study demonstrated that although the hypothesized links between job sectors and LOC were not supported, the correlations between LOC and psychological distress were supported. Post hoc analyses also demonstrated that the links between job sector prevalence and LOC were stronger for women than for men, and in many cases the links were in the opposite direction between men and women. Specifically, there was a stronger correlation between personal mastery and business sector prevalence and between personal mastery and government assist
ance prevalence for women than for men. The amount of industrial sector prevalence was also more strongly linked to perceived constraints for women than for men.

Presentation format

Poster

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The Role of Locus of Control in Predicting Distress in Different Economic Sectors

The present study examines locus of control with job sectors and determining psychological distress. We hypothesized that job sector prevalence in society links the LOC of its residents which in turn predicts psychological distress. We did a multiple regression to examine the variables of government assistance, psychological distress, LOC and economic sectors. The study measured LOC and distress through Mechanical Turk (n = 158). The study demonstrated that although the hypothesized links between job sectors and LOC were not supported, the correlations between LOC and psychological distress were supported. Post hoc analyses also demonstrated that the links between job sector prevalence and LOC were stronger for women than for men, and in many cases the links were in the opposite direction between men and women. Specifically, there was a stronger correlation between personal mastery and business sector prevalence and between personal mastery and government assist
ance prevalence for women than for men. The amount of industrial sector prevalence was also more strongly linked to perceived constraints for women than for men.