University Presentation Showcase: Undergraduate Division

Project Title

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COGNITIVE AND LINGUISTIC ABILITIES IN UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Presenter Hometown

Pike Co., KY

Major

Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Sara Incera

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COGNITIVE AND LINGUISTIC ABILITIES IN UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Kendall Hairston, Ines E. Martin, & Sara Incera

Multilingual Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Eastern Kentucky University

The goal of the present investigation is to determine the cognitive processes that influence how undergraduate students read. To date few studies have addressed this question, thus this study brings new insights to an under investigated issue. A sample of undergraduates from Eastern Kentucky University completed a cognitive task and a linguistic task. We used the mouse-tracking paradigm to measure participants' responses. We investigated whether participants with higher cognitive abilities also outperformed their peers in the linguistic task. The results indicate that cognitive and linguistic abilities are related. In conclusion, understanding how cognitive abilities influence reading in undergraduates’ students is essential for students and educators. This study can provide new insights into the cognitive processes students must use to study and analyze information.

Presentation format

Poster

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THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COGNITIVE AND LINGUISTIC ABILITIES IN UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COGNITIVE AND LINGUISTIC ABILITIES IN UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Kendall Hairston, Ines E. Martin, & Sara Incera

Multilingual Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Eastern Kentucky University

The goal of the present investigation is to determine the cognitive processes that influence how undergraduate students read. To date few studies have addressed this question, thus this study brings new insights to an under investigated issue. A sample of undergraduates from Eastern Kentucky University completed a cognitive task and a linguistic task. We used the mouse-tracking paradigm to measure participants' responses. We investigated whether participants with higher cognitive abilities also outperformed their peers in the linguistic task. The results indicate that cognitive and linguistic abilities are related. In conclusion, understanding how cognitive abilities influence reading in undergraduates’ students is essential for students and educators. This study can provide new insights into the cognitive processes students must use to study and analyze information.