University Presentation Showcase: Graduate Division

Project Title

Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Students' Views of Telepractice

Presenter Information

Mariah L. MookFollow

Presenter Hometown

Union, Kentucky

Major

Communication Disorders

Department

Special Education

Degree

Graduate

Mentor

Dr. Christen Page

Mentor Department

Special Education

Abstract

The growing use of technology has created a greater need of availability for online and socially distanced speech therapy options. Telepractice is a different service delivery model than the more common face-to-face speech therapy. Consequently, clinicians experience hesitation and doubt with the transition. The purpose of this study was to investigate perceptions of speech-language pathology graduate student clinicians following implementation of telepractice using a survey. The study used thematic analysis to answer three research questions: (1) How comfortable and confident are graduate student clinicians using telepractice? (2) What are the differences between in-person and telepractice service delivery? (3) What surprised graduate student clinicians about telepractice?

After 5 weeks of telepractice service delivery, 30 graduate student clinicians completed a 16-item survey. Findings revealed that initially students expressed several fears of telepractice associated with learning the technology, adapting materials, and nervousness related to a change in general. Over the course of the five 45-60 minute sessions, graduate student clinicians became more familiar with the technology of telepractice and confident in delivering therapy. In the end, graduate student clinicians shared positive reflections of this learning experience. The information from this study provides insight for educational programs in designing clinical curriculum focused on telepractice.

Presentation format

Poster

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Speech-Language Pathology Graduate Students' Views of Telepractice

The growing use of technology has created a greater need of availability for online and socially distanced speech therapy options. Telepractice is a different service delivery model than the more common face-to-face speech therapy. Consequently, clinicians experience hesitation and doubt with the transition. The purpose of this study was to investigate perceptions of speech-language pathology graduate student clinicians following implementation of telepractice using a survey. The study used thematic analysis to answer three research questions: (1) How comfortable and confident are graduate student clinicians using telepractice? (2) What are the differences between in-person and telepractice service delivery? (3) What surprised graduate student clinicians about telepractice?

After 5 weeks of telepractice service delivery, 30 graduate student clinicians completed a 16-item survey. Findings revealed that initially students expressed several fears of telepractice associated with learning the technology, adapting materials, and nervousness related to a change in general. Over the course of the five 45-60 minute sessions, graduate student clinicians became more familiar with the technology of telepractice and confident in delivering therapy. In the end, graduate student clinicians shared positive reflections of this learning experience. The information from this study provides insight for educational programs in designing clinical curriculum focused on telepractice.