University Presentation Showcase: Graduate Division

Project Title

Neutral and Charged Bis(diaisoylamino)biphenyl for use in Grid-Scale Battery Technologies

Presenter Hometown

Paris, KY

Major

Chemistry

Department

Chemistry

Degree

Graduate

Mentor

Judith L. Jenkins

Mentor Department

Chemistry

Abstract

Energy storage systems allow flexibility in control and maintenance of the electric grid while integrating renewable energy resources to mitigate carbon emissions. Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are stationary energy storage systems that convert chemical energy to electrical energy by charge-transfer reactions. Designing molecules that are capable of stable multi-electron redox reactions per active-species molecule can increase the efficiency of future systems. Spectroelectrochemistry, the combination of spectroscopy and electrochemistry, allows for quantitative and qualitative analyses of electron-transfer processes. The focus of this research was to use optical and electrochemical properties obtained from spectroelectrochemistry to determine the stability of neutral and charged states of a chemical species as a function of time. Exploring the relationships between molecular structure and stability is essential to the performance of RFBs because this allows for rational design of stable active species.

Presentation format

Poster

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Neutral and Charged Bis(diaisoylamino)biphenyl for use in Grid-Scale Battery Technologies

Energy storage systems allow flexibility in control and maintenance of the electric grid while integrating renewable energy resources to mitigate carbon emissions. Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are stationary energy storage systems that convert chemical energy to electrical energy by charge-transfer reactions. Designing molecules that are capable of stable multi-electron redox reactions per active-species molecule can increase the efficiency of future systems. Spectroelectrochemistry, the combination of spectroscopy and electrochemistry, allows for quantitative and qualitative analyses of electron-transfer processes. The focus of this research was to use optical and electrochemical properties obtained from spectroelectrochemistry to determine the stability of neutral and charged states of a chemical species as a function of time. Exploring the relationships between molecular structure and stability is essential to the performance of RFBs because this allows for rational design of stable active species.