University Presentation Showcase: Graduate Division

Project Title

Comparing AAC Devices: Which type is the most effective?

Presenter Hometown

Pineville

Major

Communication Disorders

Department

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Degree

Graduate

Mentor

Christen Page

Mentor Department

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Abstract

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) devices, technology or non-technology based, are commonly used to facilitate communication for children with a speech or language impairment. Previous studies support use of either device; however, clinicians are faced with the task of determining which type of device (technology or non-technology) will be most effective. For this reason, the purpose of this critically appraised topic was to determine which type of device is the best option when referring a child to use an AAC device. Four articles obtained through PubMed, Taylor & Francis Online, and Google Scholar indicated that current evidence suggests that both non-technology-based and technology-based AAC devices are effective for expressive language abilities. Despite these outcomes, studies were limited in answering which type of device is the most effective. Thus, future recommendations would be to conduct research that compares which device a child with ASD would prefer to use for communication.

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Comparing AAC Devices: Which type is the most effective?

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) devices, technology or non-technology based, are commonly used to facilitate communication for children with a speech or language impairment. Previous studies support use of either device; however, clinicians are faced with the task of determining which type of device (technology or non-technology) will be most effective. For this reason, the purpose of this critically appraised topic was to determine which type of device is the best option when referring a child to use an AAC device. Four articles obtained through PubMed, Taylor & Francis Online, and Google Scholar indicated that current evidence suggests that both non-technology-based and technology-based AAC devices are effective for expressive language abilities. Despite these outcomes, studies were limited in answering which type of device is the most effective. Thus, future recommendations would be to conduct research that compares which device a child with ASD would prefer to use for communication.