Date of Award

January 2016

Degree Type

Open Access Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Safety, Security, and Emergency Management

First Advisor

Ryan K. Baggett

Department Affiliation

Safety, Security, and Emergency Management

Second Advisor

Thomas D. Schneid

Department Affiliation

Safety, Security, and Emergency Management

Third Advisor

Sarah Morris

Department Affiliation

Safety, Security, and Emergency Management

Abstract

Cybercrime currently poses a significant threat to the infrastructure of the United States. It can exploit vulnerabilities within the Critical Infrastructure or (CI) systems that are increasingly interconnected. Although the increased interconnectedness allows for easier and more efficient communication it creates vulnerabilities that did not exist ten years ago. A lack of a standardized definition of cybercrime has made it increasingly difficult to create policy that will allow for more efficient interagency cooperation and concrete laws regarding cybercrime. Cybercrime thrives on the anonymity of the Internet with the use of specific browsers, The Onion Router for example, to access information not searchable within everyday search engines. In addition, cybercrime thrives with the increased use of peer-to-peer decentralized cryptocurrency.

Share

COinS