Abstract

Disaster resiliency is the ability of individuals and communities to anticipate, cope with, and deal with disasters through specific resources and awareness. However, at-risk populations, or those who have certain social disabilities, often lack the same level of resiliency to disasters as those who do not exhibit the same social vulnerabilities. Specifically, low-income families do not exhibit the same level of resiliency as other populations compared to other families and populations. Low-income families are often marginalized in disaster management, which plays a role in their lack of resiliency.

The following report will identify provides a general understanding of disaster resiliency and what actions communities take to enhance their community’s resiliency. A case study about Hurricane Katrina and its’ effects on the New Orleans community, particularly those who classified as low income. Specifically, it explores the reasons for how and why low-income families exhibit a lack of resiliency and are marginalized in disaster management. It does so through the lens of a case study about Hurricane Katrina and its’ effects on the New Orleans community, particularly those who were classified as low income. Additionally, the reasons why this occurs will be explored and a list of improvements for the future will be detailed to integrate into for communities to consider in order to help enhance and strengthen at-risk populations disaster resiliency for the future.

Semester/Year of Award

Spring 5-6-2022

Mentor

Chad S. Foster

Mentor Department Affiliation

Safety, Security, and Emergency Management

Access Options

Open Access Thesis

Document Type

Bachelor Thesis

Degree Name

Honors Scholars

Degree Level

Bachelors

Department

Safety, Security, and Emergency Management

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