Project Title

The Development of an Upper Division Chemistry Teaching Lab: Chalcogenide Nanocrystal Synthesis and Analysis

Major

MS Chemistry

Department

Chemistry

Degree

Graduate

Mentor

Judith L. Jenkins

Mentor Department

Chemistry

Abstract

The synthesis and characterization of functional solid-state materials is an increasingly important chemical field. As such, the purpose of this project was to develop an experiment for a CHE 515/715 laboratory in order to expose students to one such material—lead sulfide semiconductor nanocrystals—which can be used in a variety of applications including photovoltaics, photodetectors, and as photocatalysts. To design this teaching lab, first several student learning outcomes were developed to focus this experiment on both the important qualities of the material as well as the new synthetic techniques. Then, an introduction to the lab procedure was prepared by doing a literature review of relevant source materials. A possible procedure was found that allows students the opportunity to learn Schlenk line and hot injection synthesis techniques, and this procedure was tested and modified to ensure reasonable reproducibility. Finally, post-lab questions were also developed to assist students in understanding the concepts and to frame these concepts in relation to the information learned in CHE 515/715 and other chemistry courses, as CHE 515 is the capstone course for all Chemistry students graduating with a Bachelor’s of Science in Chemistry from EKU.

Presentation format

Poster

Poster Number

08

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The Development of an Upper Division Chemistry Teaching Lab: Chalcogenide Nanocrystal Synthesis and Analysis

The synthesis and characterization of functional solid-state materials is an increasingly important chemical field. As such, the purpose of this project was to develop an experiment for a CHE 515/715 laboratory in order to expose students to one such material—lead sulfide semiconductor nanocrystals—which can be used in a variety of applications including photovoltaics, photodetectors, and as photocatalysts. To design this teaching lab, first several student learning outcomes were developed to focus this experiment on both the important qualities of the material as well as the new synthetic techniques. Then, an introduction to the lab procedure was prepared by doing a literature review of relevant source materials. A possible procedure was found that allows students the opportunity to learn Schlenk line and hot injection synthesis techniques, and this procedure was tested and modified to ensure reasonable reproducibility. Finally, post-lab questions were also developed to assist students in understanding the concepts and to frame these concepts in relation to the information learned in CHE 515/715 and other chemistry courses, as CHE 515 is the capstone course for all Chemistry students graduating with a Bachelor’s of Science in Chemistry from EKU.