Project Title

Comparing Reading Intervention Effectiveness for Struggling Readers

Major

School Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Graduate

Mentor

Richard Osbaldiston

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

Reading is the quintessential academic skill. It is imperative that students who are below grade level are given interventions to strengthen their skills. The purpose of this research is to compare traditional and computerized reading interventions. A meta-analysis was conducted to determine which reading intervention style would be most appropriate for students of different grade and achievement levels. The results showed that computerized interventions were more successful for struggling students when examining standardized scores for letter-word recognition, reading fluency, and reading comprehension. Similar patterns were observed regarding these three areas as well as decoding skills for non-struggling readers. Grade did not appear to be a moderator variable as computerized interventions were found to be more effective across all grade levels. These results indicate that computerized interventions are leading to greater improvements in these areas for students implying that more classroom resources could be spent elsewhere.

Presentation format

Poster

Poster Number

012

Share

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Comparing Reading Intervention Effectiveness for Struggling Readers

Reading is the quintessential academic skill. It is imperative that students who are below grade level are given interventions to strengthen their skills. The purpose of this research is to compare traditional and computerized reading interventions. A meta-analysis was conducted to determine which reading intervention style would be most appropriate for students of different grade and achievement levels. The results showed that computerized interventions were more successful for struggling students when examining standardized scores for letter-word recognition, reading fluency, and reading comprehension. Similar patterns were observed regarding these three areas as well as decoding skills for non-struggling readers. Grade did not appear to be a moderator variable as computerized interventions were found to be more effective across all grade levels. These results indicate that computerized interventions are leading to greater improvements in these areas for students implying that more classroom resources could be spent elsewhere.