Project Title

The Effects of Various Treatments on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Major

Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Richard Osbaldiston

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

This research examines the effects of treatment on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in active duty soldiers and/or veterans. This meta-analysis used 12 studies that compared some type of psychological treatment to a control group or pretreatment condition. The standardized mean difference, d, was calculated for each study, and the weighted average effect size was computed for the set of studies. The overall effect of therapy on PTSD symptoms was d = 0.93, which is a very strong effect. For the two most commonly studied therapies, present-centered therapy was slightly more effective than cognitive processing therapy (d = 0.85 vs. 0.74). Therapy had a stronger effect on active duty soldiers (d = 1.03) compared to veterans (d = 0.57). These results suggest that PTSD is most effectively treated while soldiers are still in active duty rather than waiting until their service has ended.

Presentation format

Poster

Poster Number

069

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The Effects of Various Treatments on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

This research examines the effects of treatment on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in active duty soldiers and/or veterans. This meta-analysis used 12 studies that compared some type of psychological treatment to a control group or pretreatment condition. The standardized mean difference, d, was calculated for each study, and the weighted average effect size was computed for the set of studies. The overall effect of therapy on PTSD symptoms was d = 0.93, which is a very strong effect. For the two most commonly studied therapies, present-centered therapy was slightly more effective than cognitive processing therapy (d = 0.85 vs. 0.74). Therapy had a stronger effect on active duty soldiers (d = 1.03) compared to veterans (d = 0.57). These results suggest that PTSD is most effectively treated while soldiers are still in active duty rather than waiting until their service has ended.