Project Title

Pesticide Contamination of Urban Beehives

Department

Environmental Health Science

Abstract

Humans have used honey as a food source for more than 8,000 years. Honey has been used in numerous ancient cultures as a remedy for many illnesses. Local and specialty honeys are trending as a natural and nutritional product making it immensely popular in U.S. markets as a healthy alternative free from side effects that plague synthetic chemical sweeteners and medicines. During foraging honey bees can bring many pollutants into the hive with pesticide contaminants and residues in honey becoming a growing concern. Urban beehives are subject to increased pesticide use from businesses and homeowners. Urban produced honey and beeswax were collected and tested via GC/LC/MS methods for pyrethroid pesticide used in urban mosquito abatement, organochlorine pesticides, and heavy metals. Results showed no detectable levels of pyrethroid pesticides, but did indicate that organochlorines pesticides and lead are still persistent in our environment.

Presentation format

Poster

Share

COinS
 

Pesticide Contamination of Urban Beehives

Humans have used honey as a food source for more than 8,000 years. Honey has been used in numerous ancient cultures as a remedy for many illnesses. Local and specialty honeys are trending as a natural and nutritional product making it immensely popular in U.S. markets as a healthy alternative free from side effects that plague synthetic chemical sweeteners and medicines. During foraging honey bees can bring many pollutants into the hive with pesticide contaminants and residues in honey becoming a growing concern. Urban beehives are subject to increased pesticide use from businesses and homeowners. Urban produced honey and beeswax were collected and tested via GC/LC/MS methods for pyrethroid pesticide used in urban mosquito abatement, organochlorine pesticides, and heavy metals. Results showed no detectable levels of pyrethroid pesticides, but did indicate that organochlorines pesticides and lead are still persistent in our environment.