Project Title

Student Veterans’ Assimilation to Higher Education: The Role of Social Identity Complexity

Department

Communication

Abstract

Institutions of higher learning in America are currently experiencing the largest influx of student veterans since the end of World War II (Elliott, Gonzalez & Larsen, 2011). Since 2001, 2.5 million U.S. men and women have served in conflicts overseas. Increasing numbers of colleges and universities have initiated formal “veteran friendly” programs and policies to including: veteran orientations, veteran specific courses, and student veteran organizations. Although research in organizational assimilation often focuses on newcomers’ learning of professional roles, scholars little research to date has explored the communication factors at play as service members shift from military to college life. Drawing from social identity theory, this line of research examines the relationships among student veterans’ senses of group identity, connections with non-veteran peers and faculty, and commitment to the college institution as a whole.

Presentation format

Poster

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Student Veterans’ Assimilation to Higher Education: The Role of Social Identity Complexity

Institutions of higher learning in America are currently experiencing the largest influx of student veterans since the end of World War II (Elliott, Gonzalez & Larsen, 2011). Since 2001, 2.5 million U.S. men and women have served in conflicts overseas. Increasing numbers of colleges and universities have initiated formal “veteran friendly” programs and policies to including: veteran orientations, veteran specific courses, and student veteran organizations. Although research in organizational assimilation often focuses on newcomers’ learning of professional roles, scholars little research to date has explored the communication factors at play as service members shift from military to college life. Drawing from social identity theory, this line of research examines the relationships among student veterans’ senses of group identity, connections with non-veteran peers and faculty, and commitment to the college institution as a whole.