Project Title

Cell Phones and the Family: Friend or Foe

Presenter Hometown

Richmond

Major

Recreation & Parks Administration

Department

Recreation and Park Administration

Degree

Graduate

Mentor

Dr. Jon McChesney

Mentor Department

Recreation and Park Administration

Abstract

Kids are always on their phones and oblivious to what is going on around them. No longer do they look at people when they talk to them and they do not build empathy. There is a concerning lack of consequences and social reciprocity that comes with digital communication. This can lead to cyberbullying or the unwise sharing of delicate photos. Children are not fully engaging with other people or their own feelings. They are turning to their phones for comfort or support when they need an “ear” to listen. They are on their phones from the moment they wake up to the moment they fall asleep. Their cell phones are always an arms reach away. But, are the children the only ones guilty of cell phone addiction? There is often a focus on how to get our kids off their phones and back into the great outdoors. But what about the parents? Dr. Jenny Radesky, a developmental pediatrician at the Boston Medical Center, studied parent-child interaction at a fast food restaurant. Her findings, more than 70% of the adults used their phone during the meal. When the child was talking, the parent would respond in a mechanical kind of way or a delayed respond (Lowin, 2015). According to a recent study, 54% of kids think their parents check their device too often and 32% say they feel unimportant when their parent get distracted by their phone (Lowin, 2015).

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Poster

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Cell Phones and the Family: Friend or Foe

Kids are always on their phones and oblivious to what is going on around them. No longer do they look at people when they talk to them and they do not build empathy. There is a concerning lack of consequences and social reciprocity that comes with digital communication. This can lead to cyberbullying or the unwise sharing of delicate photos. Children are not fully engaging with other people or their own feelings. They are turning to their phones for comfort or support when they need an “ear” to listen. They are on their phones from the moment they wake up to the moment they fall asleep. Their cell phones are always an arms reach away. But, are the children the only ones guilty of cell phone addiction? There is often a focus on how to get our kids off their phones and back into the great outdoors. But what about the parents? Dr. Jenny Radesky, a developmental pediatrician at the Boston Medical Center, studied parent-child interaction at a fast food restaurant. Her findings, more than 70% of the adults used their phone during the meal. When the child was talking, the parent would respond in a mechanical kind of way or a delayed respond (Lowin, 2015). According to a recent study, 54% of kids think their parents check their device too often and 32% say they feel unimportant when their parent get distracted by their phone (Lowin, 2015).