Project Title

Faculty Expectations of Critical Reading

Presenter Hometown

Frankfort, KY

Major

Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Sara Incera

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

FACULTY EXPECTATIONS OF CRITICAL READING

Abigail Sutherland, & Sara Incera

Multilingual Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Eastern Kentucky University

Critical reading requires a deep and active engagement with the text that can be accomplished through multiple behaviors. Research has shown that the specific reading behaviors that undergraduate students engage in are different across majors. To date no study has investigated whether students’ behaviors differ due to individual faculty preferences or to systematic disciplinary influences. A sample of 128 faculty members from Eastern Kentucky University answered a survey about critical reading behaviors. All faculty reported that synthesizing and applying are more useful than previewing and reviewing. However, differences emerged between colleges; some disciplines consider previewing and reviewing useful while others do not. Interestingly, faculty report that most critical reading behaviors are useful but they do not spend lecture time modelling them. In conclusion, it is important to consider how to teach different critical reading behaviors across different disciplines. In addition, it might be helpful to encourage faculty to model in their classes the critical reading behaviors they consider most useful.

Presentation format

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Faculty Expectations of Critical Reading

FACULTY EXPECTATIONS OF CRITICAL READING

Abigail Sutherland, & Sara Incera

Multilingual Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Eastern Kentucky University

Critical reading requires a deep and active engagement with the text that can be accomplished through multiple behaviors. Research has shown that the specific reading behaviors that undergraduate students engage in are different across majors. To date no study has investigated whether students’ behaviors differ due to individual faculty preferences or to systematic disciplinary influences. A sample of 128 faculty members from Eastern Kentucky University answered a survey about critical reading behaviors. All faculty reported that synthesizing and applying are more useful than previewing and reviewing. However, differences emerged between colleges; some disciplines consider previewing and reviewing useful while others do not. Interestingly, faculty report that most critical reading behaviors are useful but they do not spend lecture time modelling them. In conclusion, it is important to consider how to teach different critical reading behaviors across different disciplines. In addition, it might be helpful to encourage faculty to model in their classes the critical reading behaviors they consider most useful.