Project Title

PILOT 2: WHO LOOKS LIKE A FOREIGN AND WHO LOOKS LIKE A NATIVE SPEAKER?

Presenter Hometown

Louisville, KY

Major

Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Sara Incera

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

The environment in which we interact with other people greatly influences how we perceive one another. Two-thirds of English speakers have a foreign accent, so understanding how visual information influences listener’s perception of foreign accents is an important and timely topic. The goal of this pilot study was to select pairs of speakers that look the same, even though they sound different. Participants rated how foreign or native an individual looked on a response bar ranging from -100 (Native) to 100 (Foreign). We excluded 5 pairs because participants did not rate the speakers the same. Therefore, forty pairs were selected for the final corpus. This study is the second of three pilot studies and the purpose is to create a corpus of sentences to investigate how visual and auditory information is processed. Selecting pairs that look the same but sound different is a crucial step in order to investigate audio-visual influences in language processing.

Presentation format

Poster

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PILOT 2: WHO LOOKS LIKE A FOREIGN AND WHO LOOKS LIKE A NATIVE SPEAKER?

The environment in which we interact with other people greatly influences how we perceive one another. Two-thirds of English speakers have a foreign accent, so understanding how visual information influences listener’s perception of foreign accents is an important and timely topic. The goal of this pilot study was to select pairs of speakers that look the same, even though they sound different. Participants rated how foreign or native an individual looked on a response bar ranging from -100 (Native) to 100 (Foreign). We excluded 5 pairs because participants did not rate the speakers the same. Therefore, forty pairs were selected for the final corpus. This study is the second of three pilot studies and the purpose is to create a corpus of sentences to investigate how visual and auditory information is processed. Selecting pairs that look the same but sound different is a crucial step in order to investigate audio-visual influences in language processing.