University Presentation Showcase: Undergraduate Division

Project Title

Meta-Analysis: Anxiety and Depression Measures in Online Therapy Treatment

Presenter Hometown

Owenton

Major

Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Richard Osbaldiston

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

Online therapy is becoming more and more popular among people who seek a newer modality of mental health treatment or cannot travel to a treatment center. The purpose of this research was to explore the effectiveness of online therapy for treating anxiety and depression. We located ten studies (total sample size N = 2,133) from PsycINFO and Google Scholar that reported anxiety and depression measures with pre/post/follow-up online treatment interventions. We coded these articles and recorded the effect size (Cohen’s d). The overall weighted average effect size of the set of studies was quite large (d = 0.77). For participants 30-35 years old, the weighted average effect size was even larger (d = 1.48). On-line therapy’s effects are not just short-lived; they were effective even at 1-3 months follow-up (d = 1.63). Findings from this study provide insight into the effectiveness of internet-based therapy on people with anxiety and depression.

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Meta-Analysis: Anxiety and Depression Measures in Online Therapy Treatment

Online therapy is becoming more and more popular among people who seek a newer modality of mental health treatment or cannot travel to a treatment center. The purpose of this research was to explore the effectiveness of online therapy for treating anxiety and depression. We located ten studies (total sample size N = 2,133) from PsycINFO and Google Scholar that reported anxiety and depression measures with pre/post/follow-up online treatment interventions. We coded these articles and recorded the effect size (Cohen’s d). The overall weighted average effect size of the set of studies was quite large (d = 0.77). For participants 30-35 years old, the weighted average effect size was even larger (d = 1.48). On-line therapy’s effects are not just short-lived; they were effective even at 1-3 months follow-up (d = 1.63). Findings from this study provide insight into the effectiveness of internet-based therapy on people with anxiety and depression.