Project Title

How effective is social skills training for children with disabilities?

Presenter Hometown

Louisville, Ky

Major

Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Richard Osbaldiston

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

There are many factors that affect children’s behaviors, and social skills training is an important one. Are there effective treatments for helping teach social skills to children with disabilities? This research examines the effects of social skills training (SST) for children with disabilities. We meta-analyzed 14 research articles from PsychInfo. We coded these articles and recorded the effect sizes for all of the studies. The result of this study showed a moderate overall weighted average effect size (d = 0.38), a moderate effect size for social skills assessed by the parents (d = 0.31), a moderately large effect size for social skills assessed by teachers (d = 0.43), and a moderate effect size for reducing emotional behavior disorders/deviant behavior (d = 0.35). These results suggest that SST is an effective strategy for children with disabilities.

Presentation format

Poster

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How effective is social skills training for children with disabilities?

There are many factors that affect children’s behaviors, and social skills training is an important one. Are there effective treatments for helping teach social skills to children with disabilities? This research examines the effects of social skills training (SST) for children with disabilities. We meta-analyzed 14 research articles from PsychInfo. We coded these articles and recorded the effect sizes for all of the studies. The result of this study showed a moderate overall weighted average effect size (d = 0.38), a moderate effect size for social skills assessed by the parents (d = 0.31), a moderately large effect size for social skills assessed by teachers (d = 0.43), and a moderate effect size for reducing emotional behavior disorders/deviant behavior (d = 0.35). These results suggest that SST is an effective strategy for children with disabilities.