University Presentation Showcase: Undergraduate Division

Project Title

Motion-Based Video Game Intervention and Balance

Presenter Information

Krystiana ScottFollow

Presenter Hometown

Ashland, KY

Major

Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Richard Osbaldiston

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

3-04 Krystiana Scott

Abstract for UPS

Conditions that limit motor skills can hinder one’s ability to live independently. Motion-based video games allow players to improve these skills in what many consider to be a more engaging experience than traditional methods. This study examines the effect of so-called “exergaming” on balance for participants using the meta-analysis method. The 18 studies included were found using EBSCOhost and Google Scholar. Participants represented a wide range of age groups, from children to elders, with a variety of conditions, such as Parkinson’s, cerebral palsy, and developmental coordination disorder. Cohen’s d was used to determine the effect size, which was large overall (d = 0.88). Studies with children as participants had a larger effect size (d = .98) than those with adults (d = .68). The results suggest that motion-based video game therapy can be an effective intervention for improving balance in many conditions.

Presentation format

Poster

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Motion-Based Video Game Intervention and Balance

3-04 Krystiana Scott

Abstract for UPS

Conditions that limit motor skills can hinder one’s ability to live independently. Motion-based video games allow players to improve these skills in what many consider to be a more engaging experience than traditional methods. This study examines the effect of so-called “exergaming” on balance for participants using the meta-analysis method. The 18 studies included were found using EBSCOhost and Google Scholar. Participants represented a wide range of age groups, from children to elders, with a variety of conditions, such as Parkinson’s, cerebral palsy, and developmental coordination disorder. Cohen’s d was used to determine the effect size, which was large overall (d = 0.88). Studies with children as participants had a larger effect size (d = .98) than those with adults (d = .68). The results suggest that motion-based video game therapy can be an effective intervention for improving balance in many conditions.