University Presentation Showcase: Undergraduate Division

Project Title

Addressing Counting Misconceptions in a Kindergarten Classroom

Presenter Information

Sarah HornbackFollow

Presenter Hometown

Lexington, Kentucky

Major

Special Education

Department

Special Education

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Dr. Mary Jo Krile

Mentor Department

Special Education

Abstract

In many classrooms, teachers face the challenge of addressing misconceptions. A misconception is a view or opinion that is incorrect based on faulty thinking or understanding. A misconception can follow a student throughout their education experience. Therefore, confronting false information in kindergarten is at the up most importance. Kindergarten is the foundation of the public education system. Many students tend to have a hard time comprehending counting strategies. During this study, a counting probe was used to test fifteen students’ understanding of counting and sublimation. Results indicated that the skill of counting which had been previous indicated by the classroom teacher as mastered, majority of students had difficulty correctly answering the probe. Data revealed students decoded the probe with diverse approaches. Implications for practitioners and for future research are discussed.

Presentation format

Poster

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Addressing Counting Misconceptions in a Kindergarten Classroom

In many classrooms, teachers face the challenge of addressing misconceptions. A misconception is a view or opinion that is incorrect based on faulty thinking or understanding. A misconception can follow a student throughout their education experience. Therefore, confronting false information in kindergarten is at the up most importance. Kindergarten is the foundation of the public education system. Many students tend to have a hard time comprehending counting strategies. During this study, a counting probe was used to test fifteen students’ understanding of counting and sublimation. Results indicated that the skill of counting which had been previous indicated by the classroom teacher as mastered, majority of students had difficulty correctly answering the probe. Data revealed students decoded the probe with diverse approaches. Implications for practitioners and for future research are discussed.