Abstract

“COVID brain,” a term coined by those who survived COVID-19 and still feel the lasting effects, ultimately raises the question of what COVID-19 is doing to the brain, specifically the executive functions. There have been little to no studies done to examine the relationship between post-COVID-19 and the brain. The current study examines whether COVID-19 leaves a long-lasting effect on processing speed, even after the person has recovered from the virus. In the laboratory setting, participants are expected to take the n-back task and the Stroop test to measure their executive functions, specifically their processing speed. The expected findings will be that participants who have had COVID-19 will have a slower processing speed compared to the participants who did not have COVID-19. The examination of the association between COVID-19 and processing speed could imply that COVID-19 is not just a respiratory disease, but also targets executive brain function. Further research could imply that post-COVID cases should be evaluated further by neuropsychologists and neurologists.

Semester/Year of Award

Spring 5-6-2022

Mentor

Adam Lawson

Mentor Department Affiliation

Psychology

Mentor Professional Affiliation

Psychology

Access Options

Open Access Thesis

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Honors Scholars

Degree Level

Bachelors

Department

Psychology

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