Project Title

Black Bears at Daniel Boone National Forest

Presenter Information

Trent L. HurtFollow

Presenter Hometown

Tompkinsville, Kentucky

Major

Recreation and Park Administration

Department

Recreation and Park Administration

Degree

Graduate

Mentor

Michael Bradley

Mentor Department

Recreation and Park Administration

Abstract

According to the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife, black bears are the most abundant and widespread of all the bear species in the world. In Kentucky, the return of black bears over the last 20 years is proving to be a true wildlife success story. Contrary to some beliefs, however, today’s growing population is not the result of a “restocking” effort. As oak forests matured after extensive logging efforts of the early 1900s, bears recolonized these habitats from our neighboring states of West Virginia, Virginia and Tennessee. (Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife, n.d.)

The survey team wanted to identify participants knowledge related to black bears. The researcher developed a 15-minute survey to identify residents’ feelings and thoughts regarding coexisting with black bears, preferred methods of black bear management policies and philosophy, and various methods to stabilize the black bear population.

By reviewing the data, it can be determined that black bears are rarely approaching human populated areas. If they are approaching the human populated areas, it seems to be a one-time experience and rarely return. Most of the bears witnessed were seen traveling and not staying in one location. Majority of respondents also mentioned that they support regulated hunting but at the same time do not support regulated black bear hunting.

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Black Bears at Daniel Boone National Forest

According to the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife, black bears are the most abundant and widespread of all the bear species in the world. In Kentucky, the return of black bears over the last 20 years is proving to be a true wildlife success story. Contrary to some beliefs, however, today’s growing population is not the result of a “restocking” effort. As oak forests matured after extensive logging efforts of the early 1900s, bears recolonized these habitats from our neighboring states of West Virginia, Virginia and Tennessee. (Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife, n.d.)

The survey team wanted to identify participants knowledge related to black bears. The researcher developed a 15-minute survey to identify residents’ feelings and thoughts regarding coexisting with black bears, preferred methods of black bear management policies and philosophy, and various methods to stabilize the black bear population.

By reviewing the data, it can be determined that black bears are rarely approaching human populated areas. If they are approaching the human populated areas, it seems to be a one-time experience and rarely return. Most of the bears witnessed were seen traveling and not staying in one location. Majority of respondents also mentioned that they support regulated hunting but at the same time do not support regulated black bear hunting.