Project Title

Linking Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment

Presenter Hometown

Lexington

Major

Non-degree Seeking

Department

Psychology

Mentor

Dr. Richard Osbaldiston

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

Do you love or hate your job? Do you think about staying forever or never going back? Do you ever think about why? This study is intended to answer that industry old question: Is there a link between job satisfaction (JS) and organizational commitment (OC)? A meta-analysis of 19 studies from across the world covering 9,917 employees from a multitude of industries shows a strong correlation between JS and OC, r = .50. This relationship was moderated by the strength of JS; samples with a high JS had a much stronger relationship (r = .58) than samples with low JS (r = .45). Globally, the largest differences in effect size were between North America (r = .60) and Asia (r = .41). Employers take note: satisfied employees may result in lower turnover, which effectively decreases overhead and recruiting costs.

Presentation format

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Linking Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment

Do you love or hate your job? Do you think about staying forever or never going back? Do you ever think about why? This study is intended to answer that industry old question: Is there a link between job satisfaction (JS) and organizational commitment (OC)? A meta-analysis of 19 studies from across the world covering 9,917 employees from a multitude of industries shows a strong correlation between JS and OC, r = .50. This relationship was moderated by the strength of JS; samples with a high JS had a much stronger relationship (r = .58) than samples with low JS (r = .45). Globally, the largest differences in effect size were between North America (r = .60) and Asia (r = .41). Employers take note: satisfied employees may result in lower turnover, which effectively decreases overhead and recruiting costs.