University Presentation Showcase: Graduate Division

Project Title

A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Two Handwriting Programs on Legibility in First Grade Students

Presenter Hometown

Richmond, Kentucky

Major

Doctor of Occupational Therapy

Department

Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

Degree

Graduate

Mentor

Dr. Julie Duckart

Mentor Department

Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy

Abstract

Handwriting is one of the most utilized forms of written communication and there is a lack of research comparing the effectiveness of two different handwriting programs in elementary aged students. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of two handwriting programs implemented in first grade classes at one elementary school in central Kentucky. The research question that guided this Capstone Project was: Which of the following handwriting programs were more effective in achieving handwriting legibility in first grade students: Handwriting Without Tears or Write Start? The theoretical frameworks and scientific underpinnings that guided this capstone project were the Conceptual Model for Performance in Handwriting, the Developmental Theory and Ayres Sensory Integration. A pre-experimental design comparing pretest and posttest data was utilized to analyze results using descriptive statistics and jamovi in first grade students. Students in each classroom received six sessions of handwriting interventions that last twenty minutes each. One classroom received Handwriting Without Tears instruction while the other classroom received Write Start instruction. Statistical significance was found for improvement in handwriting legibility in students who received the Handwriting Without Tears intervention. Both programs, Handwriting Without Tears and Write Start, demonstrated clinical significance and improvement in student handwriting legibility. The use of handwriting programs can provide a positive impact on handwriting legibility in first grade students. A hybrid model combining methods from Handwriting Without Tears and Write Start could be implemented to provide instruction to students on handwriting skills.

Presentation format

Poster

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A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Two Handwriting Programs on Legibility in First Grade Students

Handwriting is one of the most utilized forms of written communication and there is a lack of research comparing the effectiveness of two different handwriting programs in elementary aged students. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of two handwriting programs implemented in first grade classes at one elementary school in central Kentucky. The research question that guided this Capstone Project was: Which of the following handwriting programs were more effective in achieving handwriting legibility in first grade students: Handwriting Without Tears or Write Start? The theoretical frameworks and scientific underpinnings that guided this capstone project were the Conceptual Model for Performance in Handwriting, the Developmental Theory and Ayres Sensory Integration. A pre-experimental design comparing pretest and posttest data was utilized to analyze results using descriptive statistics and jamovi in first grade students. Students in each classroom received six sessions of handwriting interventions that last twenty minutes each. One classroom received Handwriting Without Tears instruction while the other classroom received Write Start instruction. Statistical significance was found for improvement in handwriting legibility in students who received the Handwriting Without Tears intervention. Both programs, Handwriting Without Tears and Write Start, demonstrated clinical significance and improvement in student handwriting legibility. The use of handwriting programs can provide a positive impact on handwriting legibility in first grade students. A hybrid model combining methods from Handwriting Without Tears and Write Start could be implemented to provide instruction to students on handwriting skills.