University Presentation Showcase: Undergraduate Division

Project Title

Who I Am and How I've Changed

Presenter Hometown

Hebron, Kentucky

Major

Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Jonathan S. Gore

Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of prejudice on self-concept change and self-esteem. Participants were 90 juniors and seniors enrolled in introductory psychology and research methods courses at Eastern Kentucky University. This correlational study required participants to take a voluntary online survey comprised of the Twenty Statements Test (TST), the Relationships, Groups, and Places Questionnaire, the Desire to Change Questionnaire, the Perceived Ethnic Discrimination Questionnaire-Community Version (PEDQ-CV), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory, and several demographic questions. The main findings discovered that experience with prejudice had an impact on strengthening both the self-concept and self-esteem. In addition, the findings discovered that students’ self-identities were solidified by their environments. This could be explained by the use of coping mechanisms developed when facing prejudice and discrimination. The main implication is that universities and colleges need to provide resources to help students improve their coping mechanisms when experiencing prejudice and discrimination.

Presentation format

Poster

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Who I Am and How I've Changed

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of prejudice on self-concept change and self-esteem. Participants were 90 juniors and seniors enrolled in introductory psychology and research methods courses at Eastern Kentucky University. This correlational study required participants to take a voluntary online survey comprised of the Twenty Statements Test (TST), the Relationships, Groups, and Places Questionnaire, the Desire to Change Questionnaire, the Perceived Ethnic Discrimination Questionnaire-Community Version (PEDQ-CV), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory, and several demographic questions. The main findings discovered that experience with prejudice had an impact on strengthening both the self-concept and self-esteem. In addition, the findings discovered that students’ self-identities were solidified by their environments. This could be explained by the use of coping mechanisms developed when facing prejudice and discrimination. The main implication is that universities and colleges need to provide resources to help students improve their coping mechanisms when experiencing prejudice and discrimination.