Project Title

The Role of the Mirror Neuron System on Antisocial Personality Disorder

Major

Psychology

Department

Psychology

Degree

Undergraduate

Mentor

Minh Nguyen

Mentor Department

Philosophy and Religion

Abstract

It is likely that an underlying biological precondition of antisocial personality disorder is an underactive mirror neuron system. Mirror neurons are brain cells that respond equally when we perform an action and when we witness someone else perform the same action (Winerman). Mirror neurons influence empathy, and a lack of empathy is characteristic of antisocial personality disorder. Those with antisocial personality disorder tend to antagonize, manipulate, or treat others either harshly or with callous indifference. People who rank high on a scale measuring empathy have particularly active mirror neuron systems (Blakeslee). If it’s too active then it can cause mirror – touch synesthesia. When another person gets touched, the synesthete feels a touch on their own body (Choi). In current research, individuals in a non-psychiatric sample have been shown to rank higher in cold-heartedness if they have the least mirror neuron function (Fecteau and others). It is logical then, that if the mirror neuron system is underactive, this could be a factor in antisocial personality disorder.

Presentation format

Poster

Poster Number

082

COinS
 

The Role of the Mirror Neuron System on Antisocial Personality Disorder

It is likely that an underlying biological precondition of antisocial personality disorder is an underactive mirror neuron system. Mirror neurons are brain cells that respond equally when we perform an action and when we witness someone else perform the same action (Winerman). Mirror neurons influence empathy, and a lack of empathy is characteristic of antisocial personality disorder. Those with antisocial personality disorder tend to antagonize, manipulate, or treat others either harshly or with callous indifference. People who rank high on a scale measuring empathy have particularly active mirror neuron systems (Blakeslee). If it’s too active then it can cause mirror – touch synesthesia. When another person gets touched, the synesthete feels a touch on their own body (Choi). In current research, individuals in a non-psychiatric sample have been shown to rank higher in cold-heartedness if they have the least mirror neuron function (Fecteau and others). It is logical then, that if the mirror neuron system is underactive, this could be a factor in antisocial personality disorder.